Training Eastern Redbud Trees

A friend recently said she didn't like Eastern redbuds because they tend to not grow straight. I couldn't help but say it helps if you're not regularly mowing them over but she does have a point; these lovely native Missouri trees do have a tendency to bow.

Tie Eastern redbud Trees to Help Them Grow Straight

Over the years, I have easily reduced that tendency by tying the young Eastern redbuds to encourage them to grow straight. Nothing difficult, I use twine and make sure the temporary fix is easily seen by anyone who may walk by, especially me, so I don't end up tripping myself.

 I tie young Eastern redbuds to nearby older trees to help them grow straight.

I tie young Eastern redbuds to nearby older trees to help them grow straight.

When I see the twine start to sag or break, it's time to check the tree to see if it can stand up on its own.

It can take 1-2 growing seasons to get the straight line you want but it is worth it to keep these lovely native Missouri trees in your landscape.

 Eastern redbuds add a lovely canopy of pink to my Missouri spring garden.

Eastern redbuds add a lovely canopy of pink to my Missouri spring garden.

Not all trees should be ramrod straight, I like the flowing curves Eastern redbuds create throughout my hillside garden.

Since deer have discouraged me from planting tulips, I like having Eastern redbud trees to give my garden a splash of pastel spring pink!

Charlotte