Tip Toe Through The Tulips

My first tulips in a couple of decades are blooming, and I can't get enough of seeing them!

My first tulips in a couple of decades are blooming, and I can't get enough of seeing them!

Tip Toe Through The Tulips

For years I would pass by those bags of tulip bulbs and remind myself there was no point in feeding the beautiful flowers to my resident deer. This past fall, I splurged on a couple of bags of mixed color tulips after the flower beds attached to my driveway retaining wall were finished. I make bulb gardens out of tulips bulbs most years but its not the same as having the bulbs blooming in the garden for weeks in spring.

Designed to be practical as well as beautiful, the driveway retaining wall includes three levels of flower beds, each adding greenery as well as stability to the wall holding up the curved road into my property.

We actually followed the design of the old railroad tie retaining wall, adding a flower bed at the bottom where the tulips are now blooming.

 My builder was proud of his work until he showed photos to a couple of people who wondered why the walls are so short.

Why would you want taller walls, I said, this way we can easily see the flowers in bloom. If the wall was taller, you couldn't see much blooming and it would all feel hemmed in. Who wants to look at tulips half way up?

Most people are used to taller walls, he said, and they don't get the flat stones at the top.

One view of the tulips blooming in the flower bed that is part of my driveway retaining wall.

One view of the tulips blooming in the flower bed that is part of my driveway retaining wall.

I like the flat stones. I can sit on the edge of the flower beds and enjoy the flowers, then I can also easily reach over and do some trimming, or add mulch. Or better yet, easily plant something. When I'm through, I can cut through the flower bed by walking on the flat stones from one side to the other. I can pretend, I said, that I was tip toeing through the tulips.

The view from the other side of the driveway retaining wall, tulips are pretty from both ends.

The view from the other side of the driveway retaining wall, tulips are pretty from both ends.

He just shook his head and smiled. My builder knows there is no such thing in my world as having too many flower beds.

And if that doesn't satisfy the people looking at the photos and wondering why someone wants flat stone walls, I said with a twinkle in my eye, just tell them your client is a goat. 

Charlotte

Flower Flies

A flower fly, also called hover fly,  on a dandelion at Bluebird Gardens.

A flower fly, also called hover fly,  on a dandelion at Bluebird Gardens.

Flower Flies

At first, I mistook this little insect for a bee, a common problem for hover flies. Hover flies are true flies but they look like small bees and wasps. They are the helicopters of the insect world, often seen hovering in the air, darting a short distance, and then hovering again.

These beneficial insects are valuable tools in the fight against aphids, thrips, scale insects and caterpillars.

Hover flies (Allograpta oblique) are also called flower flies and drone flies.  The adults feed on nectar as they pollinate flowers. The female lays her tiny, creamy white eggs near aphid colonies, and the eggs hatch in two or three days. The beneficial hover fly larvae begin feeding on the aphids as they hatch. After spending several days eating aphids, the hover fly larvae attach themselves to a stem and build a cocoon. They spend 10 days or so inside the cocoon during warm weather, and longer when the weather is cool. Adult hover flies emerge from the cocoons to begin the cycle again.

Flower flies are nearly as effective as ladybugs and lacewings at controlling aphids. A well-established population of larvae can control 70 to 80 percent of an aphid infestation. Although they are most efficient at controlling aphids, they also help control other soft-bodied insects.

The bright bands of color on a flower fly’s abdomen probably help to defend the insect from predators. The bright color makes them look a lot like wasps so that predators, such as birds, might think they can sting.

You can tell the difference between flower flies and wasps by their heads, which look like typical fly heads. Another identifying factor is that flies have two wings, while wasps have four.

Flower flies aren’t available for purchase, but you can plant flowers and herbs to attract them. Plants that attract flower flies include fragrant herbs such as Oregano, Garlic chives, Sweet alyssum, Buckwheat and Bachelor buttons. 

And dandelions.

Charlotte

Fun with Garden Gloves with Claws

Have you seen these gardening gloves with claws on the fingertips?

Have you seen these gardening gloves with claws on the fingertips?

Fun with Garden Gloves with Claws

Ok, so I don't always use gardening gloves when I should. Sometimes when I'm inspired, it's just too much trouble to stop and put them on, as I was finding a new spot for my mother's lion. I needed to make a little spot in the ground for the red brick to sit and, well - there goes my manicure.

Too easy to do, too mundane of a garden story. Enter these new garden gloves with claws, designed to make digging easier and save your hands.

I gave a friend a set and within hours he said he had to hide them because one of his friends wanted to "borrow" them. Like a good book, one should never loan a good pair of gardening gloves with any expectation to see them again.

Garden gloves with claws worked quite well in loose soil and compost.

Garden gloves with claws worked quite well in loose soil and compost.

After trying the gloves in various areas of my garden, I took them off long enough to finish cleaning my hands and painting my nails.

Then whimsical inspiration hit me and I painted another set of nails.

Adding nail polish to garden gloves with claws gives the gloves a whimsical touch.

Adding nail polish to garden gloves with claws gives the gloves a whimsical touch.

Now my garden gloves with claws are ready for garden work!

Charlotte

What Do You Call These?

Snow bells blooming at the front entrance of my house at Bluebird Gardens.

Snow bells blooming at the front entrance of my house at Bluebird Gardens.

What Do You Call These?

Of all of the spring bulbs blooming in my garden, I have to confess I love finding these. They are not the most dramatic, or even the prettiest, but their hanging white flower heads that look like tiny white bells have an air of enchantment about them. I imagine the garden fairies are nearby, playing among the green leaves. I have always called them "snow bells."

Since posting a couple of pictures of them in bloom, friends have suggested these have a different name. They grew up calling these "snow drops." For me, snow drops are the low to the ground, also white blooming bulbs that also bloom in spring but have a different flower shape. 

Snowdrops are much shorter than snowbells but share the same flower color. 

Snowdrops are much shorter than snowbells but share the same flower color. 

Snowdrops do look like they could be cousins to snowbells, don't they. Look how they share the same light green dashes at the edges of the flower petals.

Snowbells close up.

In doing a quick search for the flower pictures, I found these are also called "summer snowflakes," which seems a sweet whimsical name. Leucojum aestivum also is referred to as "dewdrop" another wonderful descriptive word for the way the white, bell-shaped flowers droop. 

Another angle of the "dewdrops" in bloom in the front flower bed.

Another angle of the "dewdrops" in bloom in the front flower bed.

I suppose at this point there is no harm in adding yet another name so - what would you call these charming white flowers if you could name them?

Charlotte

 

 

April Gardening Chores

Eastern redbuds in bloom at Bluebird Gardens.

April Gardening Chores

My garden is starting to get serious about growing this month. It’s time to try to keep up:

1.    Clean out composters and add to flower beds and fruit trees. Mix with existing soil for now; you will mulch this later. Leave a good bucket of finished compost as starter for the next compost batch and start adding leaves, grass clippings if you have them, kitchen scraps and water. Don’t forget to mix.

2.    Prune lilacs immediately after they bloom. If you wait until later in the season, you will be cutting off next year’s blooms.

3.    Continue to sow lettuce, spinach and radish seeds every 10 days or so for fresh spring salads in your round foot garden. I would call it my pot garden but that leads you to believe I am growing something completely different. Call it your garden in pots, if you prefer.

4.    If you like to grow peas, this is the last month to plant sugar snap peas and snow peas, they prefer cooler weather conditions. To keep their roots happy, mulch with cardboard to keep them cool, then add a layer of wood chips.

Daffodils in bloom around the corner from the front of my house at Bluebird Gardens.

Daffodils in bloom around the corner from the front of my house at Bluebird Gardens.

5.    As daffodils and tulips continue to grow and bloom, sprinkle compost around them to keep the bulbs well fed. As the flowers fade, remove them by snipping off the flower heads. Leave the greenery until it turns yellow; the green leaves help the bulbs store energy for next season’s blooms. Don’t mow the leaves down with the lawn mower until they turn yellow or the bulbs will gradually become smaller and you will not have any more blooms next spring.

6.    If you have a vegetable garden area, this is a good time to add cardboard to kill off any growth prior to summer planting. Don’t till it, the prevailing thought now is that tilling damages the soil ecosystem. Kill the plants you don’t want, make holes to plant the ones you do, or make trenches to plant seeds, and cover. Easy peasy. Who doesn’t like easy gardening??

7.    Start your summer plants inside in containers you can transplant outside later; tomatoes, peppers, watermelons, squash, pumpkins, cucumbers, zucchini.

8.    Don’t forget companion plants to reduce crop damage; basil is a good bug deterrent for a lot of plants.

9.    Plant for pollinators as well. I love zinnias and so do butterflies and bees. Native plants such as New England Asters, yarrow and purple coneflowers are good choices for pollinators because they have long blooming seasons. For another good annual, try sunflower seeds. Birds will love the seeds in the fall.

10.  Enjoy the beauty of Missouri’s native trees, these usually bloom this month, redbuds and dogwoods. Better yet, plant a few more native trees along with compact dwarf fruit trees. Although planting native flowers is still good for pollinators, trees provide better, and more reliable, pollen sources for bees. The smaller fruit trees are good pollen sources as well and, when pollinated by bees, will also give you easily accessible fruit to pick. That’s what I call a win-win!

Charlotte

Pansies

Purple-bordered white pansies in bloom at a local nursery center.

Purple-bordered white pansies in bloom at a local nursery center.

Pansies

It's hard to believe there is a flower I deprive myself of having but pansies come close. For some reason, I had this impression that I couldn't grow these charming spring flowers in USDA hardiness zone 5b so I tended to pass these up, even on sale.

Until several years ago, when I found a hanging basket full of pansies at the local recycling center. Thinking I could use the hanging basket, I brought the whole container home, watered the soil and left it on my deck planning to remove the spent greenery and replant. 

To my surprise, the greenery turned out to be yellow and blue pansies, quickly revived by the water.

I found a semi-shady spot for the hanging basket and enjoyed the blooming pansies through mid-summer, a good 4 months of cheerful color in a corner of my garden. I was hooked.

Large purple pansy in bloom.

Large purple pansy in bloom.

When most people think of pansies, they often think of the larger, bolder varieties often the first blooming plants found at local nurseries as spring flowers. Although those are eye-catching, I tend to gravitate to the smaller, less hybridized varieties, perhaps influenced by those Victorian flower drawings in some of the flower books my grandmother sent me many decades ago.

Pansies can be grown from seed; they are also easy to transplant from starts.  A master gardener friend told me the secret to keeping pansies growing as perennials in our zone was to make sure to keep them watered and they should pull through, even winters. 

Although I have tried to do that, I have not successfully pulled pansies through but I haven't given up trying. I have a new spot off my front porch that has good shade that looks promising for pansies. Now I'm on the lookout for blue and yellow ones on sale to add to that spot and see if I can get them to stay.

Purple pansies hand-painted on the side of a ceramic tea cup.

Purple pansies hand-painted on the side of a ceramic tea cup.

And if that doesn't work, I can always stop by a friend's house and enjoy a cup of tea in one of her lovely hand-painted ceramic cups!

Charlotte

Garden Ornaments Add Interest to Bird Baths

Garden ornaments add interest to bird baths in my garden.

Garden ornaments add interest to bird baths in my garden.

Garden Ornaments Add Interest to Bird Baths

Here's a quick way to turn a mundane cement bird bath into a unique garden focal point; add a favorite garden ornament. Or two.

Now it's not as simple as I make it sound. Finding this little squirrel holding a pinecone took months to find, in part because I could never quite find the place where these were made open when I was driving by. When I finally did, they were out of the more natural wildlife ornaments so I waited to go back in a couple of months.

Good thing because on that same day, I also found the larger than life acorn. Years ago, a very young squirrel I nicknamed "Balboa" ended up in my den. I had left the door open so my cats could go out on the porch and Balboa had decided to take a peek inside. On the coffee table was a small bowl of unshelled peanuts, leftovers from the night before.

By the time I heard the crunching sounds from the den, Balboa had started his own party and was throwing shells all over the room, totally disregarding the disdainful looks from my matronly cat Margaret sitting on the nearby sofa. If Margaret is anything, fastidious is her middle name.

Balboa had several other adventures as a youngster under Margaret's watchful eye so the giant acorn is a tribute to his first discovery of those den peanuts which must have seemed huge to a pup of a squirrel.

The squirrel statue itself is charming but adding it to the bird bath adds a nice touch to that part of the garden and quickly makes it a focal point. I added the real tree twigs to give my bees a safe place to land when they visit to get water.

The giant acorn is sitting on a rock that will soon be covered by nearby greenery. That way the acorn won't be lost when other garden sampler plants grow up around it.

This charming frog keeps another bird bath company in front of my living room window where more bees visit him every day.

This charming frog keeps another bird bath company in front of my living room window where more bees visit him every day.

And the best part?

You can easily customize any bird bath with a garden ornament, making each one into your very own unique story with very little effort. Assuming you can find the right ornament to add to the bird bath!

Charlotte

 

 

 

 

 

 

Round Foot Gardening

The beginning of my deck garden at Bluebird Gardens.

The beginning of my deck garden at Bluebird Gardens.

Round Foot Gardening

You have heard of square foot gardening, the practice of dividing up a garden plot into squares and carefully planting each square with a desired crop?

This is round foot gardening, what I used to call pot gardening but because that leads one to think of Colorado and that one is planting marijuana, let’s just be a little more square about it all. Most of my pots full of soil are at least one foot around and no one I know has a foot that looks like a circle so I think we should all be good with this new terminology.

I have been planting basic herbs and vegetables in round pots on my deck now for several years; enough years that I prefer it to trying to tend a full garden. I keep telling you, I am basically a lazy gardener. I like this option because the pots are easily accessible from my kitchen. I can also see them out my dining room windows, just in case I have forgotten a garnish or some other last minute fresh ingredient I need to add, and my squirrels look at least guilty as they sneak by stealing a cherry tomato.

Some basic gardening principles from full gardens apply here as well:

1.    Don’t plant the same crops in the same pots more than 2 years in a row so make a note and rotate. I cheat: I take photos and date them to remind myself of what I planted when and in what pot. I also use certain sticks and stakes, moving those around from year to year.

2.    Be kind to your soil. Don’t let it dry out. Keep it healthy by adding compost, mulching, keeping it watered and planted with something when you are not growing something you want to eat.

3.    If weeds grow and you haven’t planted anything else, leave the weeds. Volunteer cover crops are welcome and will keep the soil nourished in between your plantings.

4.    Frost free dates are the same. Although Mother’s Day is our traditional USDA Zone 5b date, we may be mid-April this year. If you can’t wait and get an early start, make sure you have something to protect your outside crops on those nights when temperatures dip. Other pots, plastic, even old winter coats will work to give your tender greens a little protection.

5.    Water daily. To make sure my plant roots are kept moist, I add plastic bottles with holes buried into each pot and use them to keep pots well hydrated.

6.    Add crushed soda cans, old packing peanuts, broken terra cotta pieces to pot bottoms to help lighten the weight. Keeping the bottom lose also helps water to filter through more easily.

7.    Mix vegetables with flowers to make pretty arrangements. Many herbs are edible so mix vegetables with flowers for pretty arrangements. Add violets and basil to a pot with a tomato.

Plastic bottle with holes buried in pot helps keep soil moist. Red onion is liberated from crisper.

Plastic bottle with holes buried in pot helps keep soil moist. Red onion is liberated from crisper.

8.    Go to your refrigerator and clean out your crisper of sprouting onions, potatoes, celery and carrots and you are well on your way.

9. Don't forget to dream about your garden, even one in small pots!

Charlotte

Spring Fever

Semi dwarf Bartlett pear tree in bloom at Bluebird Gardens, surviving the last week of cold.

Semi dwarf Bartlett pear tree in bloom at Bluebird Gardens, surviving the last week of cold.

"It’s spring fever. That is what the name of it is. And when you’ve got it, you want — oh, you don’t quite know what it is you do want, but it just fairly makes your heart ache, you want it so!"
~Mark Twain

Spring Fever

It's been a mild winter but just the thought that it was still winter was enough to make me want it to be spring. 

I really shouldn't complain. I could still putter outside on some winter days. My hillside gave me a clear view of the good garden bones I have to work with, a promise of new projects to tackle once the weather warmed up.

A pile of gardening catalogs and books kept me company by the fire, and a stack of projects were always only half finished.

My plants were dormant for most of the time, although the compact dwarf fruit trees started blooming a good three weeks earlier than usual.

Pink compact dwarf apricot trees are the first to bloom in early spring at Bluebird Gardens.

Pink compact dwarf apricot trees are the first to bloom in early spring at Bluebird Gardens.

The compact dwarf apricot trees are usually the first to turn their beautiful dark pink, followed by the compact dwarf peaches, which pale by comparison.

Valentine's Day used to mark the first appearance of purple crocus but our rapidly changing climate is playing havoc with plant habits, too. I finally found my first yellow crocus blooming a good month later than usual.

No matter, we made it through the last week of below freezing temperatures. I dressed my fruit trees in my winter coats and fleece blankets, picked bouquets of daffodils to enjoy inside in case they were snapped by the freezing temperatures, and have a list of projects to tackle once temperatures warm up again.

It's time for new beginnings. It's time for the fever. It's now officially spring!

Charlotte

 

How To Add Planting Spaces

If you garden in the Ozarks, you know our biggest crop is rocks. But if you want to grow something else, you need soil.

One of the ways to make rocks work for you is to use them as garden borders. The rocks will hold in soil, fallen leaves and mulch as well as slow down rain water, which eventually will all turn into soil.

In addition, you can use the rocks to soften soil areas for planting. This won't happen overnight but it will make planting a little easier later.

This is one of my garden spots with rocks as borders:

These rocks have been a flower border for a couple of years holding in soil, mulch and moisture.

These rocks have been a flower border for a couple of years holding in soil, mulch and moisture.

After some time, rocks will kill grass, weeds and other unwanted plants and you can easily move them to expand a flower bed. The remaining holes will be perfect for planting, especially if you add soil and mulch.

Rocks used as borders help break down soil for easier planting.

Rocks used as borders help break down soil for easier planting.

Another view of a flower bed I expanded by moving out the border rocks. To help rocks form the planting areas, dig a trench to initially put them in and remember to use gardening gloves when moving rocks, they can damage your hands. You also want to have a good grip on the rocks or they may roll where you don't want them to go. How do you use rocks in your garden? Charlotte

Another view of a flower bed I expanded by moving out the border rocks.

To help rocks form the planting areas, dig a trench to initially put them in and remember to use gardening gloves when moving rocks, they can damage your hands. You also want to have a good grip on the rocks or they may roll where you don't want them to go.

How do you use rocks in your garden?

Charlotte

What Every Gardener Dreams of Getting

Well, at least what this gardener dreams of getting.

Because I garden on the side of a Missouri limestone hill, one of the rarest commodities I have is soil. I do my best to make it, from crushing leaves into holes to bringing in mulch until it decomposes enough to be a planting base. Those sources seem like samples of soil so little they are.

I don't always have the time to wait for nature to make some and I have soil brought in. By the truck-full. By the dump truck-full.

It's a lot of work to get it moved but what joy to have it so close!

Charlotte

Blackberry Winter

Bluebird Gardens blackberries in bloom.

Bluebird Gardens blackberries in bloom.

We are just coming out of a blackberry winter in mid-Missouri. The expression is an Ozark term for the last cold snap of the season. According to lore, if there is thunder in February there will be a blackberry winter in May, usually past the last frost date of May 10.

When combined with a rainy spring, a blackberry winter makes it tough for plants to get a good start on the season. Bees also struggle because their source of pollen is washed way.

There are other expressions for this weather phenomena including "redbud winter" and "dogwood winter," associated with what is blooming. Of the four seasons, spring has the most storm names associated with plants growing.

Charlotte

Last of Seven Gardening Mistakes - Pesticide Over Use

Homemade insecticide with dishwashing or antibacterial soap and water in a spray bottle.

Homemade insecticide with dishwashing or antibacterial soap and water in a spray bottle.

Pesticides are a leading culprit of bee and other pollinators declining. Most of the overuse is by well-meaning home gardeners who may not realize the pursuit of garden perfection is at the cost of links in our ecosystem.

Easy Bug Repellent

Beekeepers use a few drops of dishwashing, or antibacterial, liquid in a spray bottle for most unwanted bugs. Spray again after a rain. If you want to ramp it up, add a few drops of hot sauce. Use glove when applying.

Know Your Bugs

Those caterpillars on milkweed are Monarch butterflies so get to know what are good and bad bugs. Ladybugs, praying mantis and parasitic wasps are all good friends in the garden.

Use Your Hands

Hand-picking bugs off plants also works well. Wear gloves if you don’t want to touch them and enjoy the time you get to spend outdoors doing it.

Companion Planting

Companion planting is another technique that works well to reduce bugs in your garden. Some plants are a natural bug deterrent such as marigolds, and basil.

Hang Bird Houses

Birds are bug eaters so add a few bird houses to your property to encourage birds to nest and patrol your property.

Charlotte

Six of Seven Gardening Mistakes - Rotate Crops

My new Bluebird Gardens strawberry bed refreshed with compost and new plants.

My new Bluebird Gardens strawberry bed refreshed with compost and new plants.

Lost any strawberry beds? I did last winter, and it was a mild one. My best guess is that the soil was tired and could not support the plants, which are heavy feeders.

Why Rotate Crops?

Rotating crops breaks lifecycles. Many fungal blights, rusts and spots are host specific. Their spores remain in the soil and affect the next batch of plants. Most caterpillars, beetles and borers and some nematodes also show a definite preference for certain plants or plant groups. Their eggs and larvae are in the soil awaiting their host plants.

Rotate Every Third Year

Another reason why crop rotation is important is that different plants have different nutritional requirements. A simple rule of thumb is plant the same crop only two years in a row.

Last but not least, one of the biggest mistakes home gardeners make in their gardens.

Charlotte

 

Five of Seven Gardening Mistakes - Compatible Plants

Yellow onion sets planted next to roses help keep my Bluebird Gardens roses bug-free.

Yellow onion sets planted next to roses help keep my Bluebird Gardens roses bug-free.

In this seven-part series, I am going over the biggest mistakes I see gardeners make and how to address them. I have made far more mistakes but these are the main ones I see repeated in questions readers of my weekly gardening column "Gardening to Distraction" email or call me about.

Plants That Get Along

This one is not so much a mistake as a missed opportunity for natural pest control and bigger yields. It's called "Companion Planting."

According to Amazon's book description: "Plant parsley and asparagus together and you'll have more of each, but keep broccoli and tomato plants far apart if you want them to thrive. This classic companion-gardening guide outlines the keys to creating a harmoniously varied and bountiful garden. Utilize the natural properties of plants to nourish the soil, repel pests, and secure a greater harvest. With plenty of insightful advice and suggestions for planting schemes, Louise Riotte will inspire you to turn your garden into a naturally nurturing ecosystem."

Three Sisters

The "three sisters" planting concept is the same thing, some plants are more compatible than others. I plant onions around my roses to keep bugs off the roses and to more easily find onions when I need them. I guess I could also eat my roses but I prefer them in flower vases!

Charlotte

 

Four of Seven Gardening Mistakes, Plant Bare Root Plants

Rooted elderberry starts getting potted before being planted straight into the ground.

Rooted elderberry starts getting potted before being planted straight into the ground.

There are many gardening mistakes; I have made most, if not all, of them. When I dream about my garden, I don't necessarily think about these mistakes but they do determine whether my garden turns out the way I imagined it. In this series, I am highlighting the seven gardening mistakes I hear from friends and readers of my weekly gardening column "Gardening to Distraction."

Planting Bare Roots Requires Perfecting Planting Conditions

We have all done it, ordered bare root plants and stuck them immediately in the garden. It can work if the conditions are just right; soil is moist, roots have been hydrated, temperatures are warm and these conditions continue for several weeks until the roots establish themselves. 

Most of the time, however, those perfect conditions are not available for the needed length of time.

Plant Bare Roots First in Pots

To make sure bare root plants get a good start, plant them in potting soil in pots. You can recycle pots after washing, or make pots out of common household items that are clean.

Make sure they get regular watering and are growing in conditions that will help them succeed, such as protection from wind and hot sun. Even sunny plant seedlings need a little cover until they get used to the conditions.

It does take a little more time but it's well worth the effort.

Charlotte

 

Third of Seven Gardening Mistakes - Plants In Right Place

Wild columbine has a tendency to grow in places where it can easily be damaged.

Wild columbine has a tendency to grow in places where it can easily be damaged.

There are a number of mistakes we as gardeners make, sometimes not knowing it's bad. Then there are those mistakes that take a little change of habit to have better results. Understanding the size of the plant when it grows to maturity is one of those.

Know Mature Plant Size

When we buy plants, they tend to be small or smallish. It's easy to think that's the final size of the plant unless one looks at the tag or, better yet, researches the plant characteristics. One of the best places to get information about Missouri plants, including wildflowers, is the online library at Missouri Botanical Garden: mobot.org.

In the meantime, when buying plants look at the enclosed tag and place the plant in your garden where the size will fit.

Think Through Best Place

Now I have a tendency of planting vertically. By that I mean I plan plants on top of bulbs so that once the bulbs die off, the perennial takes over for the rest of the season. Sometimes, however, the plants are too big for the space so I have to make a note and carefully dig it up to place it in a better location. Every time a plant is moved, the trauma can damage it so try to minimize any unnecessary garden travel.

A little advanced planning, and reading, will help you settle the right plant in the correct space.

Four more gardening mistakes to cover, can you guess what they are?

Charlotte

Second of Seven Gardening Mistakes - How to Water

A two-gallon watering can and $20 watering wand are essential garden watering tools.

A two-gallon watering can and $20 watering wand are essential garden watering tools.

We all make them, or develop them. Habits that stand in the way of being successful gardening. This is the second of seven gardening mistakes I certainly have made and share to remind both of us to stay away from perpetuating them.

Forgetting to Water or Shallow Watering

Either one of these are guaranteed to kill off plants. Soil needs water to keep resident bacteria and microorganisms alive and healthy. That miniscule ecosystem is what feeds plant roots so without water, the ecosystem dies and there are no nutrients to feed plant roots.

Although I have killed off my fair share of plants by forgetting to water, I now water as I plant. I carry a watering can whenever I am planting so I don’t forget or get distracted and then forget to go back.

Deep Watering Better Than Sprinklers

It is also better to water deeply with an in-ground watering wand than a sprinkler, especially when temperatures are 100F and higher. The tops of plants may die off in those temperatures but if watered, roots will survive and come back next year.

I watched a lady sitting next to her above ground sprinkler last summer. The water evaporated by the time it reached the highest point in the arch so it wasn't doing anything but giving her a cool mist. Maybe that's what she wanted but it wasn't helping her plants.

Invest in a watering wand and water deeply. They run about $20 and are the best investment in terms of water management. Not only will you have to water less frequently but your plants will have a higher survival rate.

Next, a basic practice critical to successful gardening. Do you have a favorite?

Charlotte

 

First of Seven Gardening Mistakes - Good Soil

Trying to scrimp on good soil is one of the most common, and deadly, gardening mistakes. Start with good soil, it will make all of the difference!

Trying to scrimp on good soil is one of the most common, and deadly, gardening mistakes. Start with good soil, it will make all of the difference!

Over winter, I lost my strawberry bed. I don’t have a clue what happened but a friend said he also lost his strawberries so we are comparing notes to see if we can figure out what happened.

There are other gardening mistakes that are easier to fix. As we all jump into full-time gardening, here is a reminder of seven basic gardening mistakes:

Planting in Poor Soil

Tempting to use that old bag of soil in the garage but the millions of microorganisms that feed plants are dead.

Don’t try to sneak a shovel-full of soil out of the backyard, either, that usually turns to concrete after a couple of months in a pot.

Bottom line is soil has to be healthy and rich for good growing conditions. Start with fresh soil that has been amended and is ready for use. If you know how to mix your own, even better but most people don't want to be bothered, or don't know how. It's easier to buy a bag of ready made to start, then you will be encouraged to do more soil work.

Compost Needs Time

Don’t add compost one week and plant the next, it will take a good six months for compost to get incorporated. If you start now, you should have excellent soil for fall planting.

Coming up next, another basic gardening practice that one has to follow to be successful.

Charlotte

 

Keeping Cut Lilacs Fresh

Old-fashioned lilacs are a spring favorite but they don't always cooperate in a vase.

Whether they are hybrids or the old-fashioned variety, lilacs grow on thick, sturdy stems that need a little help. Some recommend hammering the cut end so water can more easily keep the stems hydrated. I have tried but I managed to smash my fingers more than the stems.

As an alternative, I cut the end off with scissors every couple of days. Sometimes I cut straight across, other times I have angled the cut. Not sure it made much of a difference in term of direction but cutting the stems did rehydrate lilac stems I would have otherwise composted.

cutting lilacs

Once refreshed, it will take a short time for the lilacs to plump right back up.

A sprig of old-fashioned lilacs keep a sprig of geraniums company on my den's coffee table.

A sprig of old-fashioned lilacs keep a sprig of geraniums company on my den's coffee table.

So pretty!

Charlotte