Move On In!

Move On In!

Seems just yesterday I was moving these tropical plants outside on my deck so they could spend their summer in sunshine and rain showers.

In mid-Missouri, our first frost tends to occur mid to late October so it is once again time to get my tropical plants ready to move back inside.

The first step is to select which ones have to go in first, either because of their special light needs or size, sometimes both. Once in line, I do a quick hitchhiker check to make sure I am not bringing in additional residents: tree frogs, lizards, praying mantis are among passengers that have ended up scurrying across a room once the plants were moved in.

 Plant trimmings get mixed in with oak leaves and composted for next season.

Plant trimmings get mixed in with oak leaves and composted for next season.

Secondly, it's time to trim. Some years I have left the lush growth, only to be sorry later when it was a mess to clean up. This year, the growth has been trimmed, branches have been cut back and each plant was giving a good shower. There is no way to prevent bugs from getting inside but I certainly can minimize their success.

Bigger plants are either on, or get placed on, plant caddies so I can more easily place them.

Smaller plants get plastic plant trays to keep water in pots.

Now that the the plants are ready to come in, it's time to re-arrange inside furniture to give them as much window light as possible. It does get a bit tight but there is nothing like sitting in a chair surrounded by blooming greenery while it is cold and nOsnowing outside.

 One of my tropical hibiscus blooming in a bay window where it will spend the rest of winter.

One of my tropical hibiscus blooming in a bay window where it will spend the rest of winter.

What do you do to bring tropical plants inside for winter?

Charlotte